Joe Jacoby

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby welch » Sun Feb 05, 2017 11:00 am

Disgusting. Unbelievable. Idiocy: Kurt Warner voted into the HoF but not Joe Jacoby?????

Who were the other? Terrell Davis? Who? Sure, Davis had a shortened career, but what about Larry Brown? Remember: just after Jim Brown retired, he was asked what then-active runners most impressed him. Without hesitation, Jim Brown answered, "Larry Brown. He does things I could never do", meaning Larry Brown's quick takeoff, his pass-receiving, his blocking.

What did the other new HoF members do? Jason Taylor? Did Jason Taylor make it because defensive players can be linked to stats -- sacks, fumble recoveries, passes intercepted or defensed? If so, shouldn't an offensive lineman be rated by yards gained rushing and passing?

By the stats, Joe Jacoby steps on anyone else. Consider the stats in the playoffs leading to SB 17 and SB 26.

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby gushogs » Mon Feb 06, 2017 1:05 pm

SADLY IMPRESSED that Joe didn't make it to the HOF.

Terrell Davis in???? why???? this is a travesty!!!!

HaiL,
FEDUP!

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DarthMonk » Mon Feb 06, 2017 6:57 pm

Criminal.
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby Countertrey » Mon Feb 06, 2017 7:01 pm

Envision, if you will, an expletive laden rant.

Drop mic...
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Tue Feb 07, 2017 7:09 am

DarthMonk wrote:Criminal.

No yet criminal would be not voting him in as a modern era player!! That will happen if he doesn't get in next year!
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby riggofan » Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:04 am

I heard C00ley talking about this some on Monday, and I think he made a good point that Jacoby has been (unfairly) hurt by not being media involved, etc; after his football career. Guys like Davis who have continued to work in the media and be around football get an unfair boost from these idiots who make up the voting group. The whole thing stinks. 25+ years later, people still point to the 91 team as the great SB team ever. How many HoF'ers we got from that group?

Three super bowl wins. Four super bowl appearances. Four straight pro bowls. One of the greatest offensive linemen of all time from THE greatest offensive line of all time.

I would add that I mean no offense to Terrell Davis or Kurt Warner. I think both of those guys deserve their places in the HoF as well. I think its just deeply disrespectful to a deserving guy like Jacoby and to this fan base to continue to leave him out.
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby Deadskins » Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:38 am

riggofan wrote:I heard C00ley talking about this some on Monday, and I think he made a good point that Jacoby has been (unfairly) hurt by not being media involved, etc; after his football career. Guys like Davis who have continued to work in the media and be around football get an unfair boost from these idiots who make up the voting group. The whole thing stinks. 25+ years later, people still point to the 91 team as the great SB team ever. How many HoF'ers we got from that group?

Three super bowl wins. Four super bowl appearances. Four straight pro bowls. One of the greatest offensive linemen of all time from THE greatest offensive line of all time.

I would add that I mean no offense to Terrell Davis or Kurt Warner. I think both of those guys deserve their places in the HoF as well. I think its just deeply disrespectful to a deserving guy like Jacoby and to this fan base to continue to leave him out.

Absolutely. This is why Art Monk was inducted after Michael Irvin. If Monk were on TV every week, then he would have been a shoo in like he should have been.
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Tue Feb 07, 2017 9:45 am

riggofan wrote:I heard C00ley talking about this some on Monday, and I think he made a good point that Jacoby has been (unfairly) hurt by not being media involved, etc; after his football career. Guys like Davis who have continued to work in the media and be around football get an unfair boost from these idiots who make up the voting group. The whole thing stinks. 25+ years later, people still point to the 91 team as the great SB team ever. How many HoF'ers we got from that group?

Three super bowl wins. Four super bowl appearances. Four straight pro bowls. One of the greatest offensive linemen of all time from THE greatest offensive line of all time.

I would add that I mean no offense to Terrell Davis or Kurt Warner. I think both of those guys deserve their places in the HoF as well. I think its just deeply disrespectful to a deserving guy like Jacoby and to this fan base to continue to leave him out.

Yes… I spoke with "some people" on Sunday and they said the same thing...but the thing that they mentioned as unbelievable was that Jason Taylor was voted in on the first ballot
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Wed Aug 09, 2017 8:36 am

Well the 2017 Class has been enshrined and it’s time to rev the campaign back up for Joe Jacoby!! I know many will say it’s a long shot with the likes of Lewis, Moss and Urlacher now eligible. But we (I guess it’s time I came out of the closet, I was a Hogette the last ten years the group existed) are not going to go down without a fight. This is Joe’s last year of eligibility as a modern-day nominee and it would be criminal to see him go into the abyss that is the seniors committee. I beg you to please drop a note to the voters…they read them trust me! I have gotten numerous replies from them about Joe; most of them love to hear from the fans...word of caution keep it short! Follow us (Hogettes) on Twitter and Facebook and retweet and shared the memes we’ve made for Joe. This year we are going to push hard for the D.C. media to do more!! I’m really optimistic, while I really thought 2017 was his year, not one OL got in?? So you know 1 if not 2 are going to go in. So let do this!! I can tell you Joe is one of the most humble guys you’d ever want to meet; especially for a man who has accomplished what he has…he is so appreciative of what the fans are doing for him!!

P.S. I haven't forgotten about all those negative comments that were made when we retired!! :lol:

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Wed Nov 22, 2017 7:45 am

=D> 8th time as a semi-finalist!
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby welch » Wed Nov 22, 2017 12:34 pm

DEHog wrote:=D> 8th time as a semi-finalist!


Q: Who was a better tackle than Joe J during the years he played?

A: No one!!!

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DarthMonk » Fri Nov 24, 2017 7:40 pm

Who will join the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2018? Twenty-seven modern-era semifinalists (from an initial pool of 108) have moved on to the next round of the selection process, with a cut-down to 15 finalists coming in January, followed by the selection of the gold-jacket recipients. Below, Gil Brandt ranks all 27 modern-era semifinalists, further breaking down who he thinks should make it as a finalist and, finally, who, in his opinion, should be included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2018.

For more on contributor finalist Bobby Beathard, click here; for more on senior finalists Robert Brazile and Jerry Kramer, click here.

27 Roger Craig, running back (San Francisco 49ers, 1983-1990; Los Angeles Raiders, 1991; Minnesota Vikings, 1992-93): After playing fullback at Nebraska, Craig blossomed into a serious receiving threat as a pro, leading the NFL in receptions (92) in 1985 and yards from scrimmage (2,036) in 1988.

26 Leslie O'Neal, defensive end (San Diego Chargers, 1986, 1988-1995; St. Louis Rams, 1996-1997; Kansas City Chiefs, 1998-1999): The eighth overall pick in the 1986 NFL Draft won the Defensive Rookie of the Year award. He collected 132.5 sacks, including a team-high 17 in 1992.

25 Karl Mecklenburg, linebacker (Denver Broncos, 1983-1994): The 310th player chosen in the 1983 NFL Draft went on to earn six Pro Bowl nods and first-team All-Pro honors three times.

24 Don Coryell, coach (St. Louis Cardinals, 1973-77; San Diego Chargers, 1978-1986): A disciple of Sid Gillman's, Coryell was very good at what he did, demonstrating his genius in the passing game with his "Air Coryell" offense. He was very important to the development of the game we play today.

23 Jimmy Johnson, coach (Dallas Cowboys, 1989-1993; Miami Dolphins, 1996-99): Johnson won two Super Bowls in five years with the Cowboys. He's held back a bit by the length of his career and his tenure in Miami, where he broke the 10-win mark just once in four seasons.

22 Simeon Rice, defensive end (Arizona Cardinals, 1996-2000; Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2001-06; Denver Broncos, 2007; Indianapolis Colts, 2007): The third overall pick in the 1996 NFL Draft was an outstanding pass rusher, posting double-digit sacks in eight seasons en route to a career tally of 122.

21 Hines Ward, wide receiver (Pittsburgh Steelers, 1998-2011): The converted college quarterback became the all-time franchise leader in receiving yards (12,083) in Pittsburgh.

20 LeRoy Butler, safety (Green Bay Packers, 1990-2001): The member of the All-Decade Team of the 1990s earned four Pro Bowl and four All-Pro nods -- and he invented the Lambeau Leap after returning a fumbled ball that had been lateraled to him by Reggie White on Dec. 26, 1993.

19 Ronde Barber, cornerback/safety (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1997-2012): The five-time Pro Bowler and three-time first-team All-Pro was a very good Tampa corner -- he was excellent in that system. He stood out as a blitzer off the corner who forced a ton of fumbles (13).

18 Isaac Bruce, wide receiver (Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1994-2007; San Francisco 49ers, 2008-09): The former second-round pick remains the leading receiver in Rams franchise history with 14,109 yards. He also caught the winning touchdown pass in Super Bowl XXXIV, a 73-yard deep strike from Kurt Warner.

17 Torry Holt, wide receiver (St. Louis Rams, 1999-2008; Jacksonville Jaguars, 2009): A lot of people would argue Bruce belongs ahead of Holt, and that's not an unreasonable argument -- I just like Holt better. Both should get into the Hall eventually, though I think they'll cancel each other out to some degree.

16 Richard Seymour, defensive end/tackle (New England Patriots, 2001-08; Oakland Raiders, 2009-2012): The sixth overall pick in the 2001 NFL Draft was a dominant player at both tackle and end. The seven-time Pro Bowler, three-time first-team All-Pro and three-time Super Bowl winner is a quality individual, the kind of guy who is good to have on your team. Though I have him missing the cut to be one of the finalists, he and the two players ranked higher than him could easily be swapped out for one another -- they're all finalist material.

FINALISTS
15 Kevin Mawae, center/guard (Seattle Seahawks, 1994-97; New York Jets, 1998-2005; Tennessee Titans, 2006-09): Mawae was a great finisher. He could credibly play guard or center at a Pro Bowl-level. In fact, he was an eight-time Pro Bowler and three-time first-team All-Pro.

14 Everson Walls, cornerback (Dallas Cowboys, 1981-89; New York Giants, 1990-92; Cleveland Browns, 1992-93): Walls was not a burner, but he had outstanding ball skills and a great feel for the play that was being run. He was also very smart. He made a critical play in Super Bowl XXV, tackling Thurman Thomas with less than two minutes to go to keep Thomas from reaching the end zone in the Giants' 20-19 win over the Bills.

13 Brian Urlacher, linebacker (Chicago Bears, 2000-2012): Urlacher played with more heart than anybody I know of. The 2005 Defensive Player of the Year was the ultimate defensive catalyst. Not only was he one of the better linebackers in the game at his peak, but I'd place him among the top linebackers of all time.

12 Edgerrin James, running back (Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005; Arizona Cardinals, 2006-08; Seattle Seahawks, 2009): The fourth overall pick in the 1999 NFL Draft ran for an astonishing 3,262 yards in his first two seasons, leading the NFL in rushing in both years. He was the puzzle piece that allowed Peyton Manning's Colts to become a dominant team.

11 Joe Jacoby, offensive tackle (Washington Redskins, 1981-1993): Hall of Famer Randy White, who faced Jacoby and the Redskins twice a year, told me Jacoby was the best of all the tackles he played against. He was a huge man who made the Pro Bowl four times and was first-team All-Pro twice, was named to the All-Decade Team of the 1980s and started for three Super Bowl-winning teams.

10 Steve Atwater, safety (Denver Broncos, 1989-1998; New York Jets, 1999): Atwater reached the Pro Bowl eight times and won two Super Bowls. He was better against the run than the pass, but he was definitely a great tackler -- when you were hit by him, you remembered it.

9 Brian Dawkins, safety (Philadelphia Eagles, 1996-2008; Denver Broncos, 2009-2011): The nine-time Pro Bowler and member of the All-Decade Team of the 2000s was outstanding against the run. He also collected 37 picks in his career. Dawkins had great character and outstanding leadership traits.

8 Ty Law, cornerback (New England Patriots, 1995-2004; New York Jets, 2005, 2008; Kansas City Chiefs, 2006-07; Denver Broncos, 2009): I will always remember Law's three interceptions of Peyton Manning in the 2003 AFC Championship Game. Law was a very good athlete and all-around great player.

7 Alan Faneca, guard (Pittsburgh Steelers, 1998-2007; New York Jets, 2008-09; Arizona Cardinals, 2010): The nine-time Pro Bowler and member of the All-Decade Team of the 2000s was a great character person. Faneca was also a very, very good run and pass-blocker, very strong -- his man seldom made a tackle. He's among the top players at his position all-time.

6 Ray Lewis, linebacker (Baltimore Ravens, 1996-2012): The 26th overall pick in the 1996 NFL Draft made the Pro Bowl 13 times and earned seven first-team All-Pro nods. The two-time Super Bowl winner and MVP of Super Bowl XXXV was a leader on the Ravens, both as a vocal presence and with his performance. He just made so many big plays. Knowing that a maximum of five modern-era names can make it, I'd take the five listed above him for the Class of 2018, but when you're talking about talent at this level, the margin of separation is very, very thin.

MY PICKS FOR THE CLASS OF 2018

5 Tony Boselli, offensive tackle (Jacksonville Jaguars, 1995-2001; Houston Texans (injured reserve), 2002): The second overall pick in the 1995 NFL Draft allowed only 15.5 sacks over seven pro seasons. Boselli wasn't a bruiser, but he was a real technician and a super athlete with long arms.

4 John Lynch, safety (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1993-2003; Denver Broncos, 2004-07): The former third-round pick played safety in the Tampa-2 defense like he invented it. The nine-time Pro Bowler didn't have great speed or strength, but he was so smart. Lynch knew exactly where to be before the play was even executed.

3 Terrell Owens, wide receiver (San Francisco 49ers, 1996-2003; Philadelphia Eagles, 2004-05; Dallas Cowboys, 2006-08; Buffalo Bills, 2009; Cincinnati Bengals, 2010): Owens might not always have been the best team player or locker-room presence, but he was a superior athlete with size and speed that made him very hard to stop. He had everything going for him on the field -- Owens did not lack for want-to. I didn't consider off-field concerns when weighing Owens or fellow receiver Randy Moss. Skill-wise, Owens is one of the best to ever play his position, ranking second all-time in receiving yards (15,934), eighth in catches (1,078) and third in receiving touchdowns (153). It's hard to see how one could justify keeping him out.

2 Steve Hutchinson, guard (Seattle Seahawks, 2001-05; Minnesota Vikings, 2006-2011; Tennessee Titans, 2012): Hutchinson arrived at Michigan as a defensive tackle, and though he played on the other side of the line in the pros, he carried himself like a defensive tackle, with the toughness and strength that implies. Hutchinson started every game he played and reached the Pro Bowl seven times, with five first-team All-Pro nods.

1 Randy Moss, wide receiver (Minnesota Vikings, 1998-2004, 2010; Oakland Raiders, 2005-06; New England Patriots, 2007-2010; Tennessee Titans, 2010; San Francisco 49ers, 2012): They used to say Sugar Ray Robinson was the best boxer ever, pound for pound, and I think you could make a case for Moss being one of the best athletes in NFL history. He could do everything. Moss might have been lacking in football character, but on the field, he's among the best receivers of all time. He owns the single-season touchdown-reception record (23 in 2007) and is ranked 15th all-time in catches (982), third in receiving yards (15,292) and second in touchdown catches (156).
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby SkinsJock » Sat Nov 25, 2017 10:17 am

^^ OMG - after looking carefully at this - words are hard to come by

are you kidding me? :shock:
Redskins need to fire Bruce Allen, put together a good FO & get a new GM (maybe Doug Williams)
We have some good players and coaches - things could get better quickly here if we had better decision makers

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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Tue Nov 28, 2017 9:04 am

DarthMonk wrote:
Who will join the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2018? Twenty-seven modern-era semifinalists (from an initial pool of 108) have moved on to the next round of the selection process, with a cut-down to 15 finalists coming in January, followed by the selection of the gold-jacket recipients. Below, Gil Brandt ranks all 27 modern-era semifinalists, further breaking down who he thinks should make it as a finalist and, finally, who, in his opinion, should be included in the Pro Football Hall of Fame's Class of 2018.

For more on contributor finalist Bobby Beathard, click here; for more on senior finalists Robert Brazile and Jerry Kramer, click here.

27 Roger Craig, running back (San Francisco 49ers, 1983-1990; Los Angeles Raiders, 1991; Minnesota Vikings, 1992-93): After playing fullback at Nebraska, Craig blossomed into a serious receiving threat as a pro, leading the NFL in receptions (92) in 1985 and yards from scrimmage (2,036) in 1988.

26 Leslie O'Neal, defensive end (San Diego Chargers, 1986, 1988-1995; St. Louis Rams, 1996-1997; Kansas City Chiefs, 1998-1999): The eighth overall pick in the 1986 NFL Draft won the Defensive Rookie of the Year award. He collected 132.5 sacks, including a team-high 17 in 1992.

25 Karl Mecklenburg, linebacker (Denver Broncos, 1983-1994): The 310th player chosen in the 1983 NFL Draft went on to earn six Pro Bowl nods and first-team All-Pro honors three times.

24 Don Coryell, coach (St. Louis Cardinals, 1973-77; San Diego Chargers, 1978-1986): A disciple of Sid Gillman's, Coryell was very good at what he did, demonstrating his genius in the passing game with his "Air Coryell" offense. He was very important to the development of the game we play today.

23 Jimmy Johnson, coach (Dallas Cowboys, 1989-1993; Miami Dolphins, 1996-99): Johnson won two Super Bowls in five years with the Cowboys. He's held back a bit by the length of his career and his tenure in Miami, where he broke the 10-win mark just once in four seasons.

22 Simeon Rice, defensive end (Arizona Cardinals, 1996-2000; Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2001-06; Denver Broncos, 2007; Indianapolis Colts, 2007): The third overall pick in the 1996 NFL Draft was an outstanding pass rusher, posting double-digit sacks in eight seasons en route to a career tally of 122.

21 Hines Ward, wide receiver (Pittsburgh Steelers, 1998-2011): The converted college quarterback became the all-time franchise leader in receiving yards (12,083) in Pittsburgh.

20 LeRoy Butler, safety (Green Bay Packers, 1990-2001): The member of the All-Decade Team of the 1990s earned four Pro Bowl and four All-Pro nods -- and he invented the Lambeau Leap after returning a fumbled ball that had been lateraled to him by Reggie White on Dec. 26, 1993.

19 Ronde Barber, cornerback/safety (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1997-2012): The five-time Pro Bowler and three-time first-team All-Pro was a very good Tampa corner -- he was excellent in that system. He stood out as a blitzer off the corner who forced a ton of fumbles (13).

18 Isaac Bruce, wide receiver (Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1994-2007; San Francisco 49ers, 2008-09): The former second-round pick remains the leading receiver in Rams franchise history with 14,109 yards. He also caught the winning touchdown pass in Super Bowl XXXIV, a 73-yard deep strike from Kurt Warner.

17 Torry Holt, wide receiver (St. Louis Rams, 1999-2008; Jacksonville Jaguars, 2009): A lot of people would argue Bruce belongs ahead of Holt, and that's not an unreasonable argument -- I just like Holt better. Both should get into the Hall eventually, though I think they'll cancel each other out to some degree.

16 Richard Seymour, defensive end/tackle (New England Patriots, 2001-08; Oakland Raiders, 2009-2012): The sixth overall pick in the 2001 NFL Draft was a dominant player at both tackle and end. The seven-time Pro Bowler, three-time first-team All-Pro and three-time Super Bowl winner is a quality individual, the kind of guy who is good to have on your team. Though I have him missing the cut to be one of the finalists, he and the two players ranked higher than him could easily be swapped out for one another -- they're all finalist material.

FINALISTS
15 Kevin Mawae, center/guard (Seattle Seahawks, 1994-97; New York Jets, 1998-2005; Tennessee Titans, 2006-09): Mawae was a great finisher. He could credibly play guard or center at a Pro Bowl-level. In fact, he was an eight-time Pro Bowler and three-time first-team All-Pro.

14 Everson Walls, cornerback (Dallas Cowboys, 1981-89; New York Giants, 1990-92; Cleveland Browns, 1992-93): Walls was not a burner, but he had outstanding ball skills and a great feel for the play that was being run. He was also very smart. He made a critical play in Super Bowl XXV, tackling Thurman Thomas with less than two minutes to go to keep Thomas from reaching the end zone in the Giants' 20-19 win over the Bills.

13 Brian Urlacher, linebacker (Chicago Bears, 2000-2012): Urlacher played with more heart than anybody I know of. The 2005 Defensive Player of the Year was the ultimate defensive catalyst. Not only was he one of the better linebackers in the game at his peak, but I'd place him among the top linebackers of all time.

12 Edgerrin James, running back (Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005; Arizona Cardinals, 2006-08; Seattle Seahawks, 2009): The fourth overall pick in the 1999 NFL Draft ran for an astonishing 3,262 yards in his first two seasons, leading the NFL in rushing in both years. He was the puzzle piece that allowed Peyton Manning's Colts to become a dominant team.

11 Joe Jacoby, offensive tackle (Washington Redskins, 1981-1993): Hall of Famer Randy White, who faced Jacoby and the Redskins twice a year, told me Jacoby was the best of all the tackles he played against. He was a huge man who made the Pro Bowl four times and was first-team All-Pro twice, was named to the All-Decade Team of the 1980s and started for three Super Bowl-winning teams.

10 Steve Atwater, safety (Denver Broncos, 1989-1998; New York Jets, 1999): Atwater reached the Pro Bowl eight times and won two Super Bowls. He was better against the run than the pass, but he was definitely a great tackler -- when you were hit by him, you remembered it.

9 Brian Dawkins, safety (Philadelphia Eagles, 1996-2008; Denver Broncos, 2009-2011): The nine-time Pro Bowler and member of the All-Decade Team of the 2000s was outstanding against the run. He also collected 37 picks in his career. Dawkins had great character and outstanding leadership traits.

8 Ty Law, cornerback (New England Patriots, 1995-2004; New York Jets, 2005, 2008; Kansas City Chiefs, 2006-07; Denver Broncos, 2009): I will always remember Law's three interceptions of Peyton Manning in the 2003 AFC Championship Game. Law was a very good athlete and all-around great player.

7 Alan Faneca, guard (Pittsburgh Steelers, 1998-2007; New York Jets, 2008-09; Arizona Cardinals, 2010): The nine-time Pro Bowler and member of the All-Decade Team of the 2000s was a great character person. Faneca was also a very, very good run and pass-blocker, very strong -- his man seldom made a tackle. He's among the top players at his position all-time.

6 Ray Lewis, linebacker (Baltimore Ravens, 1996-2012): The 26th overall pick in the 1996 NFL Draft made the Pro Bowl 13 times and earned seven first-team All-Pro nods. The two-time Super Bowl winner and MVP of Super Bowl XXXV was a leader on the Ravens, both as a vocal presence and with his performance. He just made so many big plays. Knowing that a maximum of five modern-era names can make it, I'd take the five listed above him for the Class of 2018, but when you're talking about talent at this level, the margin of separation is very, very thin.

MY PICKS FOR THE CLASS OF 2018

5 Tony Boselli, offensive tackle (Jacksonville Jaguars, 1995-2001; Houston Texans (injured reserve), 2002): The second overall pick in the 1995 NFL Draft allowed only 15.5 sacks over seven pro seasons. Boselli wasn't a bruiser, but he was a real technician and a super athlete with long arms.

4 John Lynch, safety (Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1993-2003; Denver Broncos, 2004-07): The former third-round pick played safety in the Tampa-2 defense like he invented it. The nine-time Pro Bowler didn't have great speed or strength, but he was so smart. Lynch knew exactly where to be before the play was even executed.

3 Terrell Owens, wide receiver (San Francisco 49ers, 1996-2003; Philadelphia Eagles, 2004-05; Dallas Cowboys, 2006-08; Buffalo Bills, 2009; Cincinnati Bengals, 2010): Owens might not always have been the best team player or locker-room presence, but he was a superior athlete with size and speed that made him very hard to stop. He had everything going for him on the field -- Owens did not lack for want-to. I didn't consider off-field concerns when weighing Owens or fellow receiver Randy Moss. Skill-wise, Owens is one of the best to ever play his position, ranking second all-time in receiving yards (15,934), eighth in catches (1,078) and third in receiving touchdowns (153). It's hard to see how one could justify keeping him out.

2 Steve Hutchinson, guard (Seattle Seahawks, 2001-05; Minnesota Vikings, 2006-2011; Tennessee Titans, 2012): Hutchinson arrived at Michigan as a defensive tackle, and though he played on the other side of the line in the pros, he carried himself like a defensive tackle, with the toughness and strength that implies. Hutchinson started every game he played and reached the Pro Bowl seven times, with five first-team All-Pro nods.

1 Randy Moss, wide receiver (Minnesota Vikings, 1998-2004, 2010; Oakland Raiders, 2005-06; New England Patriots, 2007-2010; Tennessee Titans, 2010; San Francisco 49ers, 2012): They used to say Sugar Ray Robinson was the best boxer ever, pound for pound, and I think you could make a case for Moss being one of the best athletes in NFL history. He could do everything. Moss might have been lacking in football character, but on the field, he's among the best receivers of all time. He owns the single-season touchdown-reception record (23 in 2007) and is ranked 15th all-time in catches (982), third in receiving yards (15,292) and second in touchdown catches (156).



For the life of me, I don't understand Boselli being ahead of Joe or any other OL on this list. He only played 7 years and played LT for a team with a left handed QB!

Moss won't get in this year because they made Owens wait, how would you justify putting in a player who "took plays off"

I can see one position getting two players in but not two positions...The will put Lewis in before they do that!
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Re: Joe Jacoby

Postby DEHog » Wed Jan 03, 2018 7:20 am

Third year as a Finalist!!!
"Sean Taylor is hands down the best athlete I've ever coached it's not even close" Gregg Williams 2005 Mini-Camp

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